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High Power Binoculars

High power binoculars might not be something totally necessary for emergency preparedness but there can be use for binoculars that would come in handy in situations such as hunting for game, surveying, or searching for someone who is lost. Searching for the best binoculars is according to the viewer (no pun intended).  There are many different brands but the more famous such as Nikon binoculars, Steiner binoculars, Leica binoculars, Swarovski binoculars and Bushnell binoculars are some of the more sought after. Binoculars are often referred to by two numbers separated by an "x". For example: 7x35. The first number is the power or magnification of the binocular. With an 7x37 binocular, the object being viewed appears to be seven times closer than you would see it with the unaided eye. Here is a few different types of binoculars you could consider:

High Powered Binoculars

High powered binoculars are usually the big binoculars that you see and they are as they describe themselves, high powered in seeing farther distances closer.  For hand held high powered binoculars it is best not to have your magnification more than nine, more for the fact that you can't hold it steady.  If you have ten or more in magnification you would want it on a tripod or be leaning on a fence to keep the steadiness of your field. You also want to consider your aperture which is the diameter of the objective or front lens. The larger the objective lens, the more light that enters the binocular, and the brighter the image is.  If you could see the comparison, you would want the larger aperture.  Usually 50 aperture, which is the second number, or larger will give you the light you need for a clearer and brighter image for high powered binoculars.

Camera Binoculars

Are more for fun than anything but are nice to have when wanting to take a picture of something you that really like.  You might get some of your disaster shots on TV if good enough.

Water Proof Binoculars

Having water proof binoculars might be more ideal in survival situation being if you had to use them in rain or floods. Bushnell has a exclusive, patent pending, hydro-phobic (water-repellent) coating called RAINGUARD® on which condensation from rain, fog or snow forms in much smaller droplets than on standard coatings. Smaller droplets scatter less light which results in increased light transmission and a clearer image. Makes the binocular useful even when looking directly into the driving rain. Some Binoculars are made with O-ring that seals and nitrogen-purged for total waterproof and fog proof protection. These models can withstand complete immersion in water and stay dry inside. The interior optical surfaces won't fog due to rapid temperature change or humidity.  There again, these might be more ideal to have in your emergency supplies.

Compact Binoculars

Compact Binoculars are good for on the run being that they are small and light in weight.  There are some really well made ones that have good optical vision.  If having to hike or walk for long distances, these would be some to consider for your packs.


Night Vision Binoculars

If having to travel at night or searching for someone who is lost, night vision binoculars would work great for these kind of situation.  They are on the more pricey side of binoculars ranging from a few hundred dollars to thousands. Night scopes can be acquired at a much lower cost if pricing is an issue. They can be found as low as $100 for a night vision scope if you do a little searching.

Regular Binoculars

Regular binoculars are good for all types of activities and are made with many of the attributes above, such as being water proof, etc.   There are many different styles of the best binocular brands to choose from when looking for a good pair.  Your magnification and aperture on regular binoculars varies depending on what you want.  Pricing on these can be very affordable to more expensive ones that will last you for years to come.

 

Here is some information on the different parts and attributes of binoculars to consider if wanting to purchase one:

A binocular consists of two optical systems that are joined by a hinge and (typically) share a common focusing mechanism. The ability to create an image for both eyes simultaneously provides a realistic perception of depth. Binoculars are available in a great variety of sizes, magnifying powers and features to suit any purpose or preference.

Prism systems: The prism system of a binocular reduces the size needed to contain a long optical path and turns what would be an upside-down image right side up. There are two types of prism systems, roof and porro.

Roof Prism System: In roof prism binoculars the prisms overlap closely, allowing the objective lenses to line up directly with the eye piece. The result is a slim, stream-lined shape in which the lenses and prisms are in a straight line. Roof prism binoculars are less bulky and more rugged than an equivalent porro model.

Porro Prism System: In porro prism binoculars the objective or front lens is offset from the eyepiece. Porro prism binoculars provide greater depth perception and generally offer a wider field of view.

Waterproof/Fogproof: Some binoculars are O-ring sealed and nitrogen-purged for a total waterproof and fogproof protection. These models can withstand complete immersion in water and stay dry inside. The interior optical surfaces won't fog due to rapid temperature change or humidity.

Magnification (Power): Binoculars are often referred to by two numbers separated by an "x". For example: 8x32. The first number is the power or magnification of the binocular. With an 8x32 binocular, the object being viewed appears to be eight times closer than you would see it with the unaided eye.

Objective Lens Size: The second number in the formula (8x32) is the diameter of the objective or front lens. The larger the objective lens, the more light that enters the binocular and the brighter the image.

Prism Glass: Most optical prisms are made from borosilicate (BK-7) glass or barium crown (BaK-4) glass. BaK-4 is the higher quality glass yielding brighter images and high edge-to-edge sharpness.

Coated Optics: Lens surface coatings help reduce light loss and glare due to reflection for a brighter, higher contrast image with less eyestrain.

Coated: A single layer on at least one lens surface

Fully Coated: A single layer on all air-to-glass surfaces

Multi-Coated: Multiple layers on at least one lens surface

Fully Multi-Coated: Multiple layers on all air-to-glass surfaces

Field of View (FOV): The side-to-side measurement of the circular viewing field or subject area. It is defined by the width in feet or meters of the area visible at 1000 yards or meters. A wide-angle binocular features a wide field of view and is better for following action. Generally, the higher the magnification, the narrower the field of view.

Resolution: Resolution, or definition, is the ability of a binocular to distinguish fine detail or retain clarity.

Exit Pupil: Refers to the size of the circle of light visible at the eyepiece of a binocular. The larger the exit pupil, the brighter the image. To determine the size, divide the objective lens diameter by the power (an 8x32 model has an exit pupil of 4mm).

Eye Relief: The distance a binocular can be held away from the eye and still present the full field of view. Extended or long eye relief reduces eyestrain and is ideal for eyeglass wearers.

Eyeglass Wearers--Eyecups: Bushnell binoculars come with twist-up, pop-up or soft rubber fold down eyecups which go down for eyeglass wearers. These options allow everyone to see the entire field of view.

Diopter Adjustment: A "fine focus" adjustment ring usually provided around one eyepiece to accommodate for vision differences between the right and left eyes.

Rainguard®: Our exclusive, patented, hydrophobic (water repellent) coating on which condensation from rain, fog or snow forms in much smaller droplets than on standard coatings. Smaller droplets scatter less light, which results in increased light transmission and a clearer image. Makes the binocular useful even when looking directly into the driving rain.

PC-3® Phase Coating: Found on the best roof prism binoculars, this chemical coating is applied to the prisms to enhance resolution and contrast. Would not provide an advantage on porro prism models.

Rubber Armor: Rubber armor provides multiple benefits. It helps protect the binocular from the bumps and scratches that come with day-to-day use. It provides a comfortable gripping surface for making them easier to hold on to. It's easy to wipe clean after a tough day in the field. And it suppresses noise if the binoculars bump aluminum or other non-rubber surfaces, which might otherwise spook wildlife.
 

 

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